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New Zealand Certificate in Conservation (Operations) (Level 4)

New Zealand Certificate in Conservation (Operations) (Level 4)

Level 4

Want to enter the conservation industry, or upskill yourself with practical, operational skills for conservation? UCOL’s New Zealand Certificate in Conservation (Operations) Level 4 will give you the knowledge you need.

http://www.ucol.ac.nz/ProgrammeImages/Pukaha Forest.jpg
Quick info

Level: 4

Locations: Pūkaha Mt Bruce

Duration: 41 weeks

Dates:
22 Feb 2021 to 03 Dec 2021

Domestic Fees: *
TBCScholarship info

International Fees:*
TBC

Additional Fees
Compulsory course costs may apply.

* Fees are indicative only, and are inclusive of the student services levy and GST (goods and services tax). The fee shown is for one year of study.

Our New Zealand Certificate in Conservation (Operations) Level 4 programme is designed to provide you with the skills and knowledge required to carry out operational conservation work.

This programme will prepare you for practical conservation in the context of ecological restoration. You will improve your understanding of the ecological environment, and develop tools and skills so you can investigate an ecosystem and deliver strong conservation outcomes.

It would also prepare you to actively participate in the preservation of wāhi tapu and taonga tūturu by understanding the significant tikanga associated with a site according to tangata whenua.

 Career & Study Outcomes

Successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the basic principles/concepts of ecology.
  • Provide appropriate information to best represent a plant for identification purposes.
  • Outline the whakapapa of wāhi tapu according to tangata whenua.
  • Identify and explain the tikanga relating to the management of wāhi tapu and taonga tūturu, and apply fundamental heritage and recreation management principles in a conservation context.
  • Describe the principles of kaupapa Māori in relation to the resolution of conservation.
  • Gather primary data and establish patterns to make judgements about ecosystem health.
  • Discuss a range of weed control methods and the benefits of a quality weed management system.
  • Safely use and trail equipment in a LUV and/or quadbike.
  • Collect and process data and communicate findings appropriately and professionally.
  • Analyse conservation philosophy concerning biodiversity, organisational culture, animal welfare, conservation priorities, and indigenous perspectives.
  • Survey pest animal populations and create and action a predator control plan.
  • Use and maintain small, powered amenity machinery and equipment.

 Course Information

UCOL’s New Zealand Certificate in Conservation (Operations) Level 4 programme is comprised of 120 credits.

New Zealand Ecology and Wāhi Tapu (20 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the basic principles/concepts of ecology.
  • Provide appropriate information to best represent a plant for identification purposes.
  • Outline the whakapapa of wāhi tapu according to tangata whenua.
  • Identify and explain the tikanga relating to the management of wāhi tapu and taonga tūturu, and apply basic heritage and recreation management principles in a conservation context.
  • Gather primary data and establish patterns to make judgements about ecosystem health.

Mātauranga Māori (15 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Examine whānau, hapū and iwi systems and structures unique to a rohe.
  • Select and apply a range of whakataukī/whakatauāki to conservation practice.
  • Recognise the concept of tūrangawaewae and apply this to conservation practice.
  • Understand and apply tikanga in various settings such as powhiri, mihi whakatau, and noho marae.
  • Present a mihi/pepeha and select an appropriate waiata.

Weed Management (10 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss a range of weed control methods and the benefits of a quality weed management system.
  • Explain the principles of monitoring and demonstrate a monitoring method for weed management.
  • Discuss and demonstrate recording basic details of daily work, including performance reporting and results achieved.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of NZS 8409:2004 and the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 in relation to agrichemicals.
  • Prepare to apply, and apply, agrichemicals in accordance with NZS 8409:2004.

Vehicle Handling (15 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify hazards and maintain stability and traction in a LUV and/or quadbike.
  • Safely trail equipment in a LUV and/or quadbike.
  • Plan a route in accordance with terrain and weather conditions for a quadbike and/or LUV.

Kaitiakitanga and Rangatiratanga (10 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the provision in selected legislation, which supports whānau, hapū and iwi to manage te Taiao.
  • Define rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga in relation to conservation practice.
  • Describe the principles of kaupapa Māori in relation to the resolution of conservation.
  • Apply the principles of rangatiratanga, kaitiakitanga, and kaupapa Māori to a project.

Risk Assessment and Conservation Technology (10 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Evaluate and apply risk management to group activities.
  • Apply weather map information and basic weather principles to analyse the weather.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of communications technology in the field.
  • Use a GPS to navigate and track routes and manage GPS data in a conservation context.
  • Use a range of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Communications and Legislation (15 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Select and apply appropriate communication and presentation tools for a conservation context.
  • Identify stakeholders and stakeholder priorities in a conservation context.
  • Apply relevant conservation legislation appropriately in a variety of conservation settings.
  • Collect and process data and communicate findings in an appropriate and professional manner.
  • Analyse conservation philosophy with reference to biodiversity, organisational culture, animal welfare, conservation priorities, and indigenous perspectives.

Animal Pest Trapping (10 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Survey pest animal populations and create a predator control plan.
  • Evaluate the range of control methods.
  • Demonstrate the technical specification for selected methods in a field situation for specific traps.
  • Prepare, deploy, store, and dispose of toxins and bait for pest animals.
  • Undertake pest control and document trap catch results in a field situation.

Chainsaws and Construction (15 credits)
On completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Use and maintain small, powered amenity machinery and equipment.
  • Build and repair structures on remote sites.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the Approved Code of Practice relating to chainsaw use.
  • Demonstrate basic chainsaw operation.

 Domestic Entry Requirements

Achieved NCEA Level 2 – (credits in Numeracy, Science or English desirable)
OR
Certificate in Introductory Conservation (Te Kura Tapere), Level 3
OR
Equivalent Academic Achievement
OR
On a case-by-case basis at the discretion of the Executive Dean/Deputy Director, Wairarapa

 

For more information about NCEA Credits see UCOL's NCEA explained page.

 International Entry Requirements

All applicants must have a level of English sufficient to be able to study at this level.

Those applicants whose first language is not English should have an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) overall Academic score of at least 5.5 issued within the last two years (or equivalent).  IELTS scores used must be taken from a single IELTS Test Report Form (ie combining scores from more than one test is not permissible).

UCOL is a iBT testing centre.

 Advice & Guidance

Advice and Guidance

Students will be required to sign a declaration on entry to the programme stating any medical issues that UCOL needs to be aware of.

Students need to be aware of the physical requirements for operating in the New Zealand bush where the terrain is difficult, and conditions can be treacherous. 

The programme has aspects that require a certain level of agility, physical strength and fitness. Applicants must be physically capable of completing all aspects of the programme and may be asked to provide evidence.

While UCOL provides some personal protective equipment, students must supply their own specific clothing and equipment as detailed in the Student Handbook.

 Accreditation

The programme is approved by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority under the provisions of the Education Act 1989, and Universal College of Learning (UCOL) Trading as Universal College of Learning (UCOL) is accredited to teach it.

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